looking this good must be a crime.
aesthetic appreciation of vaguely lesbian things


Sep 10th | 4563

❝Jack the Ripper didn’t kill sex workers: he killed women, some of whom sold sex sometimes. Jack killed flower sellers. Jack killed charwomen. He killed mothers, daughters, sisters, and wives. The case files that Ripper historians scrutinise for clues about his identity contain extraordinary details about these women’s ordinary and fascinating lives.

From these files, I learned about their friends, their lovers and their children; their love of drink, their quick tempers, and their favourite songs. I have seen pictures of their dead faces, and read coroners’ reports about the weight of their lungs, livers and hearts. These women are infinitely more interesting to me than the identity of their killer. Finding out about their poverty, their work and their experiences of injustice and inequality is far more important than their killer’s DNA. They are the real story of the Whitechapel murders. It is time for popular history to think more about them, and less about Jack.❞

The Guardian (via dr-erland)

(Source: glorianas)

4563 notes Sep 10 via aintgotnoladytronblues originally glorianas
tagged: ▫historyyes
Sep 3rd | 33289 jhenne-bean:

smidgetz:

thisisqueenesther:

smidgetz:

goldacrylicnails:

duckindolans:

rachelstewartjewelry:



BETTY BOOP - OriginMs. ESTHER JONES, known by her stage name, “Baby Esther,” was an ” African-American singer and entertainer of the late 1920s. She performed regularly at the (The Cotton Club) in Harlem. Singer Helen Kane saw her act in 1928 and (COPIED or stole ). Ms Jones’ ‘baby’ Singing Style! > for a recording of “I Wanna Be Loved By You.” Ms. Jones’ singing style went on to become the inspiration for (( Max Fleischer )) cartoon character’s Voice and SINGING style of BETTY BOOP, was YES a Black Woman. Her singing trademark Was.. “boop oop a doop “.. In a baby voice at the cotton club in Harlem. - Esther Jones who’s stage name was “Baby Esther” was a popular entertainer at Harlem’s Cotton Club in the late 1920s. Baby Esther interpolated words such as ‘Boo-Boo-Boo’ & ‘Doo-Doo-Doo’ in songs at a cabaret. Helen Kane SAW Baby’s act in 1928 and (stole) Used it in her hit song I Wanna Be Loved By You.An early test sound film was also discovered, which featured Baby Esther performing in this style, disproving Kane’s claims. Baby Esther’s manager also testified that Helen Kane had saw Baby Esther’s cabaret act in 1928. Supreme Court Judge Edward J. McGoldrick ruled: “The plaintiff has failed to sustain either cause of action by proof of sufficient probative force”. In his opinion, the “baby” technique of singing did not originate with Kane.$250,000 infringement lawsuitEsther’s manager also testified that , Helen Kane & her manager , saw Baby’s act somewhere between 1928-1929.Scholar Robert G.O’ Meally said, Betty Boop The WHITE CARTOON herself had, as it were, a BLACK grandmother in her backround.Baby Esther was presumed dead by 1934, just when the lawsuit had ended.@Learn your History or they will Hide it from you.@BLACK-American MUSIC and DANCE Styles. - Influential WorldWide “



don’t forget that Betty Boop was a major influence in Osamu Tezuka’s work. Tezuka is considered one of the fathers of modern anime with the “big doe eyes” style so to some extent all anime girls nowadays owe part of their legacy to this lady!

This was not her???
She was a darker skinned Black woman, who is this???


This picture pops up for her as well.

The photo directly above is Baby Esther. The darker skinned woman you’re referring to would be Little Esther, an R&B singer from the 50s. And Helen Kane (the Betty Boop imitation at the top) is a thief. (Hopefully this tumblr entry will clear up some confusion.)

The mystery is solved y’all. So many twists and turns though, thanks Queen Esther for breaking it down.

“Baby Esther’s manager also testified that Helen Kane had saw Baby Esther’s cabaret act in 1928.”
white people stay stealing i cannot deal with this

jhenne-bean:

smidgetz:

thisisqueenesther:

smidgetz:

goldacrylicnails:

duckindolans:

rachelstewartjewelry:

BETTY BOOP - Origin

Ms. ESTHER JONES, known by her stage name, “Baby Esther,” was an ” African-American singer and entertainer of the late 1920s. She performed regularly at the (The Cotton Club) in Harlem. 

Singer Helen Kane saw her act in 1928 and (COPIED or stole ). Ms Jones’ ‘baby’ Singing Style! > for a recording of “I Wanna Be Loved By You.” 

Ms. Jones’ singing style went on to become the inspiration for (( Max Fleischer )) cartoon character’s Voice and SINGING style of BETTY BOOP, was YES a Black Woman. 

Her singing trademark Was.. “boop oop a doop “.. In a baby voice at the cotton club in Harlem. - 
Esther Jones who’s stage name was “Baby Esther” was a popular entertainer at Harlem’s Cotton Club in the late 1920s. Baby Esther interpolated words such as ‘Boo-Boo-Boo’ & ‘Doo-Doo-Doo’ in songs at a cabaret. 
Helen Kane SAW Baby’s act in 1928 and (stole) Used it in her hit song I Wanna Be Loved By You.

An early test sound film was also discovered, which featured Baby Esther performing in this style, disproving Kane’s claims. Baby Esther’s manager also testified that Helen Kane had saw Baby Esther’s cabaret act in 1928. 

Supreme Court Judge Edward J. McGoldrick ruled: “The plaintiff has failed to sustain either cause of action by proof of sufficient probative force”. In his opinion, the “baby” technique of singing did not originate with Kane.

$250,000 infringement lawsuit

Esther’s manager also testified that , Helen Kane & her manager , saw Baby’s act somewhere between 1928-1929.
Scholar Robert G.O’ Meally said, Betty Boop The WHITE CARTOON herself had, as it were, a BLACK grandmother in her backround.

Baby Esther was presumed dead by 1934, just when the lawsuit had ended.

@Learn your History or they will Hide it from you.
@BLACK-American MUSIC and DANCE Styles. - Influential WorldWide “

don’t forget that Betty Boop was a major influence in Osamu Tezuka’s work. Tezuka is considered one of the fathers of modern anime with the “big doe eyes” style so to some extent all anime girls nowadays owe part of their legacy to this lady!

This was not her???

She was a darker skinned Black woman, who is this???

This picture pops up for her as well.

The photo directly above is Baby Esther. The darker skinned woman you’re referring to would be Little Esther, an R&B singer from the 50s. And Helen Kane (the Betty Boop imitation at the top) is a thief. (Hopefully this tumblr entry will clear up some confusion.)

The mystery is solved y’all. So many twists and turns though, thanks Queen Esther for breaking it down.

Baby Esther’s manager also testified that Helen Kane had saw Baby Esther’s cabaret act in 1928.”

white people stay stealing i cannot deal with this

33289 notes Sep 3 via moniquill originally rachelstewartjewelry
tagged: ▫history
Sep 3rd | 5494

Better Identification of Viking Corpses Reveals: Half of the Warriors Were Female | Tor.com →

releasethebatsss:

karethdreams:

 - toopunkforlogic

Sep 2nd | 42198

thymoss:

railroadsoftware:

no one ever says that Rome needed help from aliens to build their empire

#l laughed for days when i found out that #ancient egyptians used water to reduce friction and move blocks for distances #and that this was literally DEPICTED ON THEIR HIEROGLYPHICS #but ~western archaeologists~ #thought that the pouring of water depicted ~superstitious rituals~ #jfc

42198 notes Sep 2 via chestnut-podfic originally railroadsoftware
tagged: ▫history
Aug 31st | 52760 theblacksophisticate:

atane:

zuky:

nezua:

Flappers shaming Miley Cyrus.

Oddly enough we could say that Miley Cyrus is following solidly in the appropriative footsteps of white flappers, who in the 1920s grabbed national attention and stirred alarmism concerning the end of civilization because they partied to Black music, wore their hair short like Josephine Baker (who fled US racism to become a superstar in Europe), and imitated dance moves from Baker and other Black dancers. The famously flapperesque Charleston was lifted from the African American dance called the Juba, which had West African roots and was danced in secret in the South and the Caribbean. The dance sped up when it reached Harlem, giving birth to both tap dancing and the Broadway hit called The Charleston, which spread like wildfire from there. White people didn’t sway their hips this scandalously prior to that era, making flappers roughly equivalent to white twerkers of the Jazz Age.

This is 100% true. The period from the jazz age to the beat generation, comparatively speaking was the height of cultural appropriation of black art. The beat generation used lingo popularized by Lester Young. They then appropriated the style, dress, and lingo of bebop musicians like Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, down to the beret, glasses, and soul patch. Bebop musicians, Parker and Gillespie in particular, were the blueprint of their image. Norman Mailer wrote an essay titled “The White Negro" that tackles this phenomenon. I’m no fan of Norman Mailer, but at least he admitted that white people were stealing from blacks. He wrote it in 1957.
With regards to the flappers, apart from Josephine Baker, they also liberally borrowed from black vaudeville performers. They would copy dance moves from black performers, and then introduce it as their own. Many dances attributed to whites are from black vaudeville performers who were forced to perform on the chitlin’ circuit because of segregation and Jim Crow laws.
It really is astonishing how nothing has changed in this regard. For example, people to this day still call Benny Goodman “the king of swing”, when what he did was procure charts for arrangements from Fletcher Henderson, a black man. Goodman’s biggest hits were from Henderson. It’s amazing how much credit Goodman gets for another man’s work. Of course Goodman became “the king of swing”, while Fletcher Henderson remains a footnote in history. How a white man becomes the king of something innovated by blacks is astounding. Benny Goodman is called “the king of swing”. Paul Whiteman is called “the king of jazz”. Elvis Presley is called “the king of rock n roll”. Is Eminem the king of rap? What about Justin Timberlake and Robin Thicke with r&b? Miley is soon on her way to become “the queen of twerking”.
Anyway, apart from getting his charts from Fletcher Henderson, Benny Goodman got his ass handed to him by Chick Webb at the Savoy Ballroom when they had a battle of the bands. Goodman is often noted as being one of the few white men in the segregation era to have black men in his band, and the narrative is typically presented as if he did it out of benevolence. He did it because there was no way to get around the fact that swing music was the domain of black folks, and he poached the best black players he could find to bolster his band, and black musicians went with him because as a white man, he was able to pay them more than black bandleaders, and they wouldn’t have to deal with indignity while traveling. Many hotels refused black bands, so they often had to sleep in cars, bus terminals, or crash at the homes of hospitable blacks. A big portion of Duke Ellington’s money went towards renting out train cars and making sure his orchestra had a place to sleep while on the road because hotels often turned them down because they were black. These were issues Goodman wasn’t going to face. Black musicians certainly didn’t go with him because he was the best. Goodman even later hired Henderson to arrange and play in his band. He wasn’t doing it because he loved black people. Black people were the ones creating and innovating. Where else would he get the best charts and arrangements? Now that the smoke has cleared and the dust has settled, Goodman gets all the credit. Funny how that works.
This stuff has been going on for a long time. Miley is the 2013 version. Twerking has been around for a long time, but Miley convulses on national tv and all of a sudden, dictionary definitions of twerking are made. Definitions complete with no mention of black people, like all this happened in a vacuum. It’s history repeating itself over and over again. I see the same thing happening with afrobeat music.

The more you know.

theblacksophisticate:

atane:

zuky:

nezua:

Flappers shaming Miley Cyrus.

Oddly enough we could say that Miley Cyrus is following solidly in the appropriative footsteps of white flappers, who in the 1920s grabbed national attention and stirred alarmism concerning the end of civilization because they partied to Black music, wore their hair short like Josephine Baker (who fled US racism to become a superstar in Europe), and imitated dance moves from Baker and other Black dancers. The famously flapperesque Charleston was lifted from the African American dance called the Juba, which had West African roots and was danced in secret in the South and the Caribbean. The dance sped up when it reached Harlem, giving birth to both tap dancing and the Broadway hit called The Charleston, which spread like wildfire from there. White people didn’t sway their hips this scandalously prior to that era, making flappers roughly equivalent to white twerkers of the Jazz Age.

This is 100% true. The period from the jazz age to the beat generation, comparatively speaking was the height of cultural appropriation of black art. The beat generation used lingo popularized by Lester Young. They then appropriated the style, dress, and lingo of bebop musicians like Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, down to the beret, glasses, and soul patch. Bebop musicians, Parker and Gillespie in particular, were the blueprint of their image. Norman Mailer wrote an essay titled “The White Negro" that tackles this phenomenon. I’m no fan of Norman Mailer, but at least he admitted that white people were stealing from blacks. He wrote it in 1957.

With regards to the flappers, apart from Josephine Baker, they also liberally borrowed from black vaudeville performers. They would copy dance moves from black performers, and then introduce it as their own. Many dances attributed to whites are from black vaudeville performers who were forced to perform on the chitlin’ circuit because of segregation and Jim Crow laws.

It really is astonishing how nothing has changed in this regard. For example, people to this day still call Benny Goodman “the king of swing”, when what he did was procure charts for arrangements from Fletcher Henderson, a black man. Goodman’s biggest hits were from Henderson. It’s amazing how much credit Goodman gets for another man’s work. Of course Goodman became “the king of swing”, while Fletcher Henderson remains a footnote in history. How a white man becomes the king of something innovated by blacks is astounding. Benny Goodman is called “the king of swing”. Paul Whiteman is called “the king of jazz”. Elvis Presley is called “the king of rock n roll”. Is Eminem the king of rap? What about Justin Timberlake and Robin Thicke with r&b? Miley is soon on her way to become “the queen of twerking”.

Anyway, apart from getting his charts from Fletcher Henderson, Benny Goodman got his ass handed to him by Chick Webb at the Savoy Ballroom when they had a battle of the bands. Goodman is often noted as being one of the few white men in the segregation era to have black men in his band, and the narrative is typically presented as if he did it out of benevolence. He did it because there was no way to get around the fact that swing music was the domain of black folks, and he poached the best black players he could find to bolster his band, and black musicians went with him because as a white man, he was able to pay them more than black bandleaders, and they wouldn’t have to deal with indignity while traveling. Many hotels refused black bands, so they often had to sleep in cars, bus terminals, or crash at the homes of hospitable blacks. A big portion of Duke Ellington’s money went towards renting out train cars and making sure his orchestra had a place to sleep while on the road because hotels often turned them down because they were black. These were issues Goodman wasn’t going to face. Black musicians certainly didn’t go with him because he was the best. Goodman even later hired Henderson to arrange and play in his band. He wasn’t doing it because he loved black people. Black people were the ones creating and innovating. Where else would he get the best charts and arrangements? Now that the smoke has cleared and the dust has settled, Goodman gets all the credit. Funny how that works.

This stuff has been going on for a long time. Miley is the 2013 version. Twerking has been around for a long time, but Miley convulses on national tv and all of a sudden, dictionary definitions of twerking are made. Definitions complete with no mention of black people, like all this happened in a vacuum. It’s history repeating itself over and over again. I see the same thing happening with afrobeat music.

The more you know.

(Source: melanskyyworld)

52760 notes Aug 31 via atomicdomme originally melanskyyworld
tagged: ▫jazzhistorymusic
Jul 29th | 8178

medievalpoc:

sourcedumal:

note-a-bear:

ooooooh

OOOH LOOK AT THAT HISTORICAL ACCURACY THO

In which fantasy fiction with characters of color is subjected to the “historical accuracy” test and comes out on top once again…

(fyi this is the author of The Throne of the Crescent Moon, which has been featured for Fiction Week previously)

image

(Source: everythingrhymeswithalcohol)

8178 notes Jul 29 via moniquill originally everythingrhymeswithalcohol
tagged: ▫history
Jul 27th | 16804

❝Johnnie Phelps, a woman sergeant in the army, thought, “There was a tolerance for lesbianism if they needed you. The battalion I was in was probably about ninety-seven percent lesbian.”
Sergeant Phelps worked for General Eisenhower. Four decades after Eisenhower had defeated the Axis powers, Phelps recalled an extraordinary event. One day, the general told her, “I’m giving you an order to ferret those lesbians out. We’re going to get rid of them.”
“I looked at him and then I looked at his secretary who was standing next to me, and I said, ‘Well, sir, if the general pleases, sir, I’ll be happy to do this investigation for you. But you have to know that the first name on the list will be mine.’ “
“And he was kind of taken aback a bit. And then this women standing next to me said, ‘Sir, if the General pleases, you must be aware that Sergeant Phelp’s name may be second, but mine will be first.”
“Then I looked at him, and said, ‘Sir, you’re right. They’re lesbians in the WAC battalion. And if the general is prepared to replace all the file clerks, all the section commanders, all the drivers-every woman in the WAC detachment-and there were about nine hundred and eighty something of us-then I’ll be happy to make that list. But I think the general should be aware that among those women are the most highly decorated women in the war. There have been no cases of illegal pregnancy. There have been no cases of AWOL. There have been no cases of misconduct. And as a matter of fact, every six months since we’ve been here, the general has awarded us a commendation for meritorious conduct.”
“And he said, ‘Forget the order.’”❞

The Gay Metropolis, page 47, Charles Kaiser (via bibliothekara)

Phelps tells this story herself in the excellent 1984 documentary Before Stonewall, which you can watch in its entirety on YouTube (she’s at 19:30, but really, watch the whole thing): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kX7AxQd82H8

(via theodoradove)

This makes me laugh every time I see it.

(via thegreatgodum)

16804 notes Jul 27 via olive-the-olive originally bibliothekara
tagged: ▫queer stuffhistory
Jul 4th | 431

on the fourth of july, remember that american independence was a land grab →

monetizeyourcat:

you hear this a lot, but what does it mean, specifically?

the pre-1776 americans who came from a sex, race, and class background that enabled them to participate in the conventional history of america sought to buy into aristocracy as a system of production. they were the…

431 notes Jul 4 via cosmicnarwhals originally monetizeyourcat
tagged: ▫historyamerican history
May 15th | 1185

qbits:

historia-polski:

In 2011 Mówią Wieki, a Polish historical magazine announced a poll in which readers chose the most influential women in Poland’s history.  Among those chosen were monarchs, saints, actresses, writers, activists, scientists, and war heroes.  These ten women topped the list:

Maria Skłodowska-Curie (7 November 1867 – 4 July 1934) was a Polish and naturalized-French physicist and chemist who conducted pioneering research on radioactivity. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, the only woman to win in two fields, and the only person to win in multiple sciences. She was also the first woman to become a professor at the University of Paris, and in 1995 became the first woman to be entombed on her own merits in the Panthéon in Paris.  Her achievements included a theory of radioactivity (a term that she coined), techniques for isolating radioactive isotopes, and the discovery of two elements, polonium and radium. Under her direction, the world’s first studies were conducted into the treatment of neoplasms, using radioactive isotopes. She founded the Curie Institutes in Paris and in Warsaw, which remain major centres of medical research today. During World War I, she established the first military field radiological centres. (source) Read More

Elżbieta Zawacka (19 March 1909 – 10 January 2009), known also by her war-time nom de guerre Zo, was a Polish university professor, scouting instructor, SOE agent and a freedom fighter during World War II. She was also a Brigadier General of the Polish Army (the second and last woman in the history of the Polish Army to hold this rank), promoted by President Lech Kaczyński on May 3, 2006. The only woman among the Cichociemni, she served as a courier for the Home Army, carrying letters and other documents from Nazi-occupied Poland to the Polish government in exile and back. Her regular route ran from Warsaw through Berlin and Sweden to London. She was also responsible for organizing routes for other couriers of the Home Army. (source)

Irena Sendlerowa (15 February 1910 – 12 May 2008) was a Polish nurse/social worker who served in the Polish Underground during World War II, and as head of children’s section of Żegota, an underground resistance organization in German-occupied Warsaw. Assisted by some two dozen other Żegota members, Sendler smuggled some 2,500 Jewish children out of the Warsaw Ghetto and then provided them with false identity documents and with housing outside the Ghetto, saving those children during the Holocaust.  The Nazis eventually discovered her activities, tortured her, and sentenced her to death, but she managed to evade execution and survive the war. In 1965, Sendler was recognized by the State of Israel as Righteous among the Nations. Late in life she was awarded Poland’s highest honor for her wartime humanitarian efforts. She appears on a silver 2008 Polish commemorative coin honoring some of the Polish Righteous among the Nations. (source)

Urszula Ledóchowska (17 April 1865 – 29 May 1939) was a Polish Catholic Religious Sister, who founded the Congregation of the Ursulines of the Agonizing Heart of Jesus. She was a member of the prominent Ledóchowski family. She has been declared a saint by the Catholic Church.  In Kraków she opened a home for female university students. At that time, that was a new phenomenon. With a special blessing of Pope Pius X, she went to St. Petersburg in Russia, where she worked to build up St. Catharine House, which was a residence for Roman Catholic Polish youth living there. She wore civil clothes, because Roman Catholic institutions were illegal in the Russian Empire. As the tsarist government oppression to Catholics grew, she moved to Russian-controlled Finland, where she translated prayers and songs for Finnish fishermen, who usually were Protestants. In 1914, she finally was expelled from the empire.  After then settling in Stockholm, Sweden, Ledóchowska started a language school and a domestic science school for girls. In Denmark, she founded an orphanage. In 1920, she moved back to Poland with 40 other nuns who had joined her in her mission. With permission from Rome, she changed her independent monastery in Pniewy into the then newly founded Congregation of the Ursulines of the Agonizing Heart of Jesus. In 1928 she founded a religious centre in Rome. In 1930 she sent 30 nuns to female Polish workers in France. (source)

Jadwiga Andegaweńska (1373/4 – 17 July 1399) was monarch of Poland from 1384 to her death. Her official title was ‘king' rather than 'queen', reflecting that she was a sovereign in her own right and not merely a royal consort. She was a member of the Capetian House of Anjou, the daughter of King Louis I of Hungary and Elizabeth of Bosnia.  In 1387, Jadwiga led two successful military expeditions to reclaim the province of Halych in Red Ruthenia, which had been retained by Hungary in a dynastic dispute at her accession. As she was an heiress to Louis I of Hungary herself, the expeditions were for the most part peaceful and resulted in Petru I of Moldavia paying homage to the Polish monarchs in September 1387.  In 1390 she began a correspondence with the Teutonic Knights, followed by personal meetings in which she opened diplomatic negotiations herself.  She sponsored writers and artists and donated much of her personal wealth, including her royal insignia, to charity, for purposes including the founding of hospitals.  She financed a scholarship for twenty Lithuanians to study at Charles University in Prague to help strengthen Christianity in their country, to which purpose she also founded a bishopric in Vilnius. Among her most notable cultural legacies was the restoration of the Kraków Academy, which in 1817 was renamed Jagiellonian University in honour of the Jadwiga and her husband, Władysław II Jagiełło. (source) Read More

Izabela Czartoryska (3 March 1746 – 15 July 1835) was a Polish aristocrat, writer, art collector, and founder of Poland’s first museum, the Czartoryski Museum in Kraków.  In 1775, together with her husband, Czartoryska completely transformed the Czartoryski Palace at Puławy into an intellectual and political meeting place. Her court was one of the most liberal and progressive in the Commonwealth, although some aspects of her behavior also caused scandals.  In 1784 she joined the Patriotic Party.  After the suppression of the Kościuszko Uprising, her sons Adam Jerzy and Konstanty Adam were taken as political hostages by Russia’s Empress Catherine II.  In 1796 Izabela ordered the rebuilding of the ruined palace at Puławy and began a museum. Among the first objects to be included were Turkish trophies that had been seized by Polish King Jan III Sobieski's forces at the 1683 Battle of Vienna. Also included were Polish royal treasures and historic Polish family heirlooms. In 1801 Izabela opened the first museum in Poland, the Temple of the Sibyl, also called “The Temple of Memory”. It contained objects of sentimental importance pertaining to the glories and miseries of human life. During the November Uprising in 1830, the museum was closed. Izabela's son Adam Jerzy Czartoryski, going into exile in Paris, evacuated the museum's surviving objects to the Hôtel Lambert. His son Władysław Czartoryski would reopen the museum in 1878 in Kraków, where it exists today. (source)

Pola Negri (December 31, 1896 – 1 August 1987) was a Polish stage and film actress who achieved worldwide fame during the silent and golden eras of Hollywood and European film for her tragedienne and femme fatale roles. She was the first European film star to be invited to Hollywood, and became one of the most popular actresses in American silent film. She also started several important women’s fashion trends that are still staples of the women’s fashion industry. Her varied career included work as an actress in theater and vaudeville; as a singer and recording artist; as an author; and as a ballerina. (source)

Bona Sforza (2 February 1494 - 19 November 1557) member of the powerful Milanese House of Sforza. In 1518, she became the second wife of Sigismund I the Old, the King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania, and became the Queen of Poland and Grand Duchess of Lithuania.  Almost from the beginning of her life in Poland, Queen Bona tried to gain a strong political position. She began to form her own cabal and also benefited from the support of the king. She was also supported by Piotr Kmita Sobieński, Andrew Ladislaus and Piotr Gamrat, taking them to her offices and creating the so-called Triumvirate. She managed to also get Pope Leo X to decide on the appointment of fifteen ecclesiastical benefice of very high importance (e.g. in Kraków, Gniezno, Poznań, Włoclawek and Frombork).  In foreign policy, she was a fierce opponent of the Habsburgs and a supporter of a closer alliance with France. In Hungary during the wars that took place after the Battle of Mohacs in 1526, supported by János Szapolyai against the Habsburgs. Bona also sought to maintain good relations with Sublime Porte and contacts with Roxelana, the most important wife of Suleyman the Magnificent. Bona was also a spokesperson for connecting Silesia to the Crown in return for her hereditary principality Bari and Rosano, but Sigismund the Old did not support the idea and the whole project collapsed. Bona managed to also carry out tax reforms in Lithuania and agricultural products (including uniform duties of the peasants and a unit of area measurements). (source) Read More

Maria Konopnicka (May 23, 1842 – October 8, 1910) was a Polish poet, novelist, writer for children and youth, a translator, journalist and critic, as well as an activist for women’s rights and Polish independence. She used the pseudonym Jan Sawa and others. She was one of the most important Polish poets of the positivism in Poland period.  In addition to being an active writer, she was also a social activist, organizing and participating in protest actions against the repression of ethnic (primarily Polish) and religious minorities in Prussia.  She was also involved with the women’s rights activism.  Konopnicka wrote prose (primarily short stories) as well as poems.  One of her most characteristic styles were poems stylized as folk songs.  She would try her hand at many genres of literature, such as reportage sketches, narrative memoirs, psychological portrait studies and others.  Common theme in her works included the oppression and poverty of the peasantry, the workers and the Polish Jews.  Her works were also highly patriotic and nationalistic.  Due to her sympathy for the Jewish people she was described as a philosemite.  One of her best known works is the long epic in six cantos, Mister Balcer in Brazil (Pan Balcer w Brazylii, 1910), on the Polish emigrants in Brazil.  Another one was Rota (Oath, 1908) which set to the music by Feliks Nowowiejski two years later became an unofficial anthem of Poland, particularly in the territories of the Prussian partition.  This patriotic poem was strongly critical of the Germanization policies and thus described as anti-German.  Her most famous children’s literature work is the 1896 O krasonoludkach i sierotce Marysi’ (Little Orphan Mary and the Gnomes). Her children literature works were well received, as compared to many other works of the period.  Maria Konopnicka also composed a poem about the execution of the Irish patriot, Robert Emmett. Emmett was executed by the British authorities in Dublin in 1803, but Konopnicka published her poem on the topic in 1908.  She was also a translator. Her translated works include Ada Negri’s Fatalita and Tempeste, published in Poland in 1901. (source)

Emilia Plater (13 November 1806 – 23 December 1831) was a Polish–Lithuanian noblewoman and revolutionary from the lands of the partitioned Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth. Raised in a patriotic Polish tradition, she fought in the November 1830 Uprising, during which she raised a small unit, participated in several engagements, and received the rank of captain in the Polish-Lithuanian insurgent forces. Near the end of the Uprising, she fell ill and died. Though she did not participate in any major engagement, her story became widely publicized and inspired a number of works of art and literature. She is a national heroine in Poland, Lithuania and Belarus, all formerly parts of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. She has been venerated by Polish artists and by the nation at large as a symbol of women fighting for the national cause. (source

ukontentowana I thought you might like this if you haven’t already seen it. : )

May 4th | 100

CLASSICAL HISTORIOGRAPHY FOR CHINESE HISTORY  →

asianhistory:

Speaking of Historiography, here’s an excellent Princeton based collection of references and bibliographies regarding Chinese History up to the Qing Dynasty.  

100 notes May 4 via asianhistory originally asianhistory
tagged: ▫historychinese history
Apr 12th | 1551

❝I am a friend, comrades, a friend!❞

Yuri Gagarin’s first words upon returning to earth, to a woman and a girl near where his capsule landed. (12 April 1961) The woman asked: “Can it be that you have come from outer space?” to which Gagarin replied: "As a matter of fact, I have!" (via asonlynasacan)

Reblogging again for today’s historical significance

(via asonlynasacan)

(Source: billionquotes.com)

1551 notes Apr 12 via cosmicnarwhals originally asonlynasacan
tagged: ▫historyspace
Jan 20th | 8003

sources for prepatriarchal persephone

auntiewitch:

"However, long before the mythical Hades was ever conceived, in more ancient, pre-patriarchal times, Persephone was Queen of the Underworld and was another form of Hecate. Originally, the Triple Goddess was represented by Kore, the virgin; Demeter, the mother preserver; and Hecate or Persephone, the destroyer. In later years, Kore and Persephone became the same Goddess. The pomegranate was an ancient symbol of female fertility; the souls of the underworld ate pomegranates so that they could be reborn. They are standing in front of a bas-relief of their reunion from Eleusis, Greece, early 5th century BCE and are holding Boetian figures used in the Demeter and Persephone rites from the mid 6th century BCE. Demeter’s ribbed seed necklace is from Kourion, 400-300 BCE; her earring is part of a pendant with 2 bees from Mallia, Middle Minoan, 1700-1550 BCE. Persephone’s pomegranate pendant is from Enkomi, Cyprus, 1400-1300 BCE; her earring is from Mycenae, 1550-1500 BCE; her bracelet from Thessaly, 8th century BCE.” (x)

"In another sense a process was completed that had been in motion since the dawn of the patriarchy. In the earliest representations of the story of Demeter and Persephone, only the Goddesses were present. As the patriarchy gained power, the story was changed. Persephone, instead of going of her own free will into the underworld, was abducted by the (now male) God of Death and became his captive bride. In the stories of Ishtar and Inanna, male “consorts” were introduced. In the legend of Isis, the Dying Goddess became the male Osiris.” (x)

The rape motif in the story underscores that the Hellenic takeover was a violent one that wrested power from women. In the words of Robert Graves, “It refers to male usurpation of the female agricultural mysteries in primitive times.”” (x)

Basically, if you can’t grasp that fact that Persephone’s rape was a patriarchal representation and installation of the Greek’s doing as a means to oppress Goddess worship and the matriarchy, wow, I don’t know even know what do for you.

Jan 5th | 449

❝In 1903, Japanese agricultural workers joined with their Mexican fellow workers in a strike against sugar-beet growers in Ventura County, California. After winning the strike, they organized a local union and applied to the American Federation of Labor for a charter. President Gompers [of the AFL] himself wrote back to J.M. Larraras, the local secretary, explaining that Federation policy prohibited issuance of charters to locals with Asian members. Larraras replied that the Mexicans would ‘stand by our Japanese brothers’ because the Asian immigrants also stood by them. Displaying far more class-consciousness than Gompers, Larraras continued: ‘We would be false to them, to ourselves, and to the cause of unionism if we now accepted privileges for ourselves which are not accorded to them.’❞

James Green, The World of the Worker: Labor in Twentieth-Century America

This book is such a magnificent read. It has so much useful information on people of color, immigrants, and women in labor unions and has really great information on wildcat strikes, general strikes, and the IWW.

(via marxvx)

449 notes Jan 5 via chestnut-podfic originally marxvx
tagged: ▫historybooksto read
Dec 18th | 147548

vintagegal:

Affectionate Ladies c. 1900s-1980s

147548 notes Dec 18 via amazonpoodle originally vintagegal
tagged: ▫queer stuffhistory
Dec 16th | 1904
1904 notes Dec 16 via moniquill originally medievalpoc
tagged: ▫historyinterestingracism